First Years' First Impressions

Robert Weir, Class of 2018

Robert Weir, Class of 2018

Rob Weir – First Year and First Time Civilian

Hometown: San Pedro, California

KV:  What has been the hardest element of the transition from Army life?

RW: The hardest element has been not being a member of the “tribe”.  By tribe I mean a close-knit group of interdependent people.  In the Army, during every part of my day I was surrounded by a diverse group of people who shared the same experiences and same hardships.  After months on end of being around each other everyone feels like a brother or sister - someone you can trust with your life. Business school is very busy and social, but at the end of the day you head back to your apartment and that social connection is lost.  It is a bit different than what I am used to.

KV:  In what ways is the Army and business school similar?

RW:  Both are very fast-paced and time-oriented, which requires me to plan out the day to meet the various commitments.  Additionally, both involve talking to a lot of people.  In the Army, talking to people is how things get done.  Business school feels the same way.

KV:  What is your #WhyBooth moment?

RW:  I typically get to the Winter Garden early to get some work done, before most people start streaming in from the trains.  Every morning as I am sitting in WG I find myself talking to someone different and learning something new or unique about one of my classmates.  This hasn’t stopped since day one.  These conversations really make me feel like I am broadening my perspective.  It is a really special part of Booth for me.

Kyle Veatch, Class of 2018

Kyle Veatch, Class of 2018

Josh Dupont, Class of 2018

Josh Dupont, Class of 2018

Josh Dupont – First Year and First Time Daddy

Hometown:  San Diego, California

KV: What is the hardest part about being a parent in business school?

JD:  Time management.  Business school is demanding with classes, clubs, recruiting, and social obligations.  Tack on a wife, 6-month-old, dog and part-time job…woof!  I am constantly searching for ways to create more time than there is in the day, and prioritize accordingly.  Of course, above all, family comes first.  My wife Lauren is a rock-star and has been incredibly supportive, knowing that business school is somewhat of a “selfish” time for me.  I have learned the value of saying “no”, a necessary evil in business school, but make sure to take advantage of the social experiences and relationship building – which are invaluable aspects of the Booth experience.

KV:  What is your #WhyBooth moment?

JD:  On the bus ride up to LOR I sat next to one of my squad members who happened to be from Russia.  Despite incredibly diverse backgrounds, we were able to connect on a personal level and we will always be close thanks to Booth.  Over the course of two hours, we were able learn about the intimate details of our families, values and upbringing.  It was a subtle, yet indelible memory from my Booth experience.  

KV:  What has surprised you most about Booth?

JD:  I did not realize how valuable Booth Partners and Partners for Little Ones would be.  Both groups provide an incredible support network and sense of community for my family and have been a great way to engage my wife and son Charlie with the other Boothies.  It’s also been awesome to engage with other parents who are going through a similar situation.